3Cs in Construction
3Cs in Construction

3Cs in Construction: Communication, Collaboration and Connecting Workflows

pcs-logo-N-whiteBG-caption-01.png

Be part of our exclusive Construction Professional list and get exclusive discounts and monthly executive summary

* indicates required
() - (###) ###-####
Subscription to Newsletter *

Subscribe

* indicates required
Subscription to Newsletter *
* indicates required
Subscription to Newletter *

Introduction

 

Miscommunication has been one of the biggest problems in the construction industry. When the methods of communication aren’t properly planned, it later becomes a challenge for a project leads to relay instructions to his members or a member reporting progress or problem to the leader. Consequently, the project will suffer from delays and the team may face issues and misunderstandings that stop productivity.

When construction collaboration is strong, team members pool their knowledge and resources to prioritize reaching shared goals dictated by the budget and timeline of the entire process rather than their individual goals. This, of course, ultimately, is the ideal way to managing construction. We will also provide actionable and practical tips to enhance communication between the office and the field, bridging coordination on the whole.

Learn more here.

Statistics On Construction Communication

- 3Cs in Construction: Communication, Collaboration and Connecting Workflows

When it comes to managing construction projects, communication is vital to project success and completion. Poor communication is one of the top reasons construction projects fail. In fact, it’s the reason one-third of the time, according to the Project Management Institute (PMI). From miscommunication to failing to communicate, poor communication is detrimental to any project, even if it succeeds in the end.

Look at it this way: of the projects with minimally effective communication, just 37% of those are done on time, 48% are completed within budget, and 52% meet their original goals. That’s opposed to projects with highly effective communication– 71% of which finish on time, 76% are completed within budget, and 80% meet their original goals. These statistics prove that clear and proper communication is vital for a construction project to have the best possible outcome. 

Additionally, teamwork between field and office in construction begins with excellent communication. The two parties must share confidential information in a timely fashion to get the best results. The flow of data between the office and job site is critical to a project, and any drawback in communication creates avoidable and unwanted stressors in managing construction.

Importance of Connection in a Divided Industry

Miscommunication and conflict on the job site are nothing to be surprised about. But although it’s nothing new, it doesn’t mean it’s one you just have to accept it. No one needs the stress that these two problems bring into a construction project. Additionally, they also happen to be very expensive. One research reported that the average cost of a conflict on a job site was $10,948.00! And that was just the average. A conflict might even cost you hundreds and thousands of dollars if not handled promptly and correctly.

Office and field communication is critical to a well-run project. However, countless times it feels like office and field teams operate their world. The office people may never foot on a construction job site because they are not required to do so. At the same time, workers in the field may never decipher the back-end intricacies of collaborating with different designers, architects, engineers, suppliers, and owners- all at the same time.

While office personnel is integral to coordinating nearly all aspects of the project behind the scenes, at the same time, without the skillset and dedication of the boots on the ground, nothing will ever get finished or done right. Each discipline contributes its talents to the construction project, and it’s vital to strengthen the respect and trust between the different players.

Challenges of Unclear Team Collaboration